WRC8 Wheel Settings

Another racing game, and another set of options to fine tune hardware become available.  Here are our suggestions on the WRC8 wheel settings to get you started in your official world championship rally career.  These are based on the Logitech G29 setup, but could be used as a beginning point for other wheels and pedals.  It’s worth noting that in WRC8 the settings are not locked off depending on the controller attached like other games, but if your kit doesn’t support the option then it’s not going to have any impact.  Changes can be made mid-stage if desired so feel free to head into a practice and tweak away.

We’ve started by trying out gravel, tarmac and ice, and the impact of the options across the changing surfaces.  First up are the force and effects WRC8 wheel settings which just focus on the feedback you’re going to feel.  The game sets everything to 100 to begin with, and the sliders range between 0 and 150, so there’s quite a bit of scope for adjustment.  Mostly these are going to be useful for setting the power of your wheel, and we’d recommend aiming for having the tyre load a little higher than the rest so that the road surface resistance comes through.  This will make tarmac driving feel heavier than gravel and snow lighter still.  Of course, getting airborne should drop nearly all the resistance off.

WRC8 Wheel Settings

Next up are the WRC8 wheel settings for vibration.  These are all for how much of each element you are going to feel through the wheel, and there are a couple of nice options in here.  Tyre slip is a must so you can figure out the traction and surface adherence, and coupling it with a higher Ground surface value should give a decent feel for when the cars are gripping and when they’re sliding.  For us this is the most important aspect to have overriding the rest, otherwise it can get lost in the melee of shaking and banging when going flat out.  Suspension and Collision are both centred around getting the car knocked about and having that transmitted through the steering column, with the former pretty useful for understanding bumpy sections.  The last one that’s for the G29 is Engine as it sets the vibration of things like over-revving and gear changes; the Throttle pedal and Brake pedal are for Fanatec wheels only.

WRC8 Wheel Settings

As for the basic control setup, there’s no changes to the accelerator, the default seems to pick up foot position reasonably well… as long as you’re gentle with your movements.

Braking defaults are also decent, with the vast majority of the resistance in the G29 pedal making up the second 50% of the gauge, so it works for both the deft touch and forcing the car to halt.

Clutch – like the last two it can probably be left on the defaults.

With the steering it’s again pretty good from the off.  Depending on your feel you may want to increase the saturation a bit if you’re finding any lag in turning corners.  If you really fancy some fun then hit up invert and try and navigate the stages that way… we’re kidding, definitely don’t do that.

There are quite a few WRC8 wheel settings to have a look at, and all come with a decent description of what effect it’s trying to convey.  Of course, our guidelines are just that – a guide – so you’ll want change these to suit your particular preference.  For those that don’t have the luxury of a wheel and pedal setup, then be comforted that the controller works just as well for hurtling through forests and up mountains.  Keep an eye out on the site for our review of the game.

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Matt

Co-founder & Editor at Codec Moments

Gamer, F1 fanatic, amateur DJ (out of practice), MGS obsessed, tech geek.

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