Leisure Suit Larry: Wet Dreams Dry Twice

Leisure Suit Larry: Wet Dreams Dry Twice

It'll have you pointing and clicking all over the place.

wet dreams dry twice

It’s not without a bit of surprise that there’s another Leisure Suit Larry game.  We quite enjoyed the last outing in Wet Dreams Don’t Dry where Larry was brought into the modern world and had some of his more unacceptable behaviours smoothed away.  We didn’t know how it would land with a wider audience in the climate at the time, though it must have done alright though because Assemble Entertainment have brought Wet Dreams Dry Twice to consoles after its PC release earlier this year.  As a direct follow on, its main aim is to pit your wits against those of the developers, and maybe mask that it’s a hardcore puzzler under the softcore shenanigans.  If you’re thinking that it’s all about teasing and titillation then you’d be… slightly right, but that would mean reducing a title that pays homage as much as it lampoons film, TV and modern culture to a stereotype and missing out a lot of its good points.  There’s an allegory about it’s what’s on the inside that counts in that last sentence somewhere.

Picking straight up from the finale of the last game, Wet Dreams Dry Twice sees Larry searching for the love of his life and former Prune CEO Faith in the holiday resort of Cancum.  He wants to track her down and start the rest of his life with her, though things aren’t going to be that easy.  Faith has gone missing in an island archipelago; Prune has been taken over by the nefarious Mr. Wang and is hunting her for the sophisticated AI she’d developed; Larry’s PiPhone assistant is becoming increasingly sassy; and he’s meant to be marrying the chief of Cancum’s daughter.  On top of that there’s a mysterious agent tracking Larry believing that he’s a top secret agent.  With that kind of setup there’s a lot to do to find his lost love and stop the evil corporation from wreaking havoc on the free world.  Suddenly it’s taking Larry from hapless sex maniac to saviour of the world, though in reality it’s more like Mr. Bean meets James Bond whilst channelling a low rent McGuyver.  That’s not meant as an insult, it works well for the character and the trappings of point and click adventures.

As expected, Wet Dreams Dry Twice’s world is bright, colourful and just a bit shabby.  It’s a world that’s seen better days and needs a bit of TLC, much like Larry himself.  He returns as the same fellow from the last game, though Pi’s been teaching him the finer points of being a more conscious and socially responsible person, and not as much of a sleaze.  The fact that this is covered in the opening section suggests that the team wanted to make a point early on that despite the stigma of the series, there’s an intent here to not offend.  It’s a fair statement and one that means throughout the game there’s little to rile sensibilities, but it’s done by omission.  Whereas the last game at least attempted a level of inclusivity, this one feels like it avoids it, so makes a step backward in that regard.  Larry isn’t a misogynistic asshole, but he’ll never miss a chance to make a pass at a woman (even though he’s looking for the person he wants to settle down with), and the game doesn’t miss an opportunity to belittle him for it.  He’s is a perfect foil for the adventure elements though – learning as he goes, resourceful and full of quips and double-entendres.

There are a few new elements to get to grips with alongside the standard examine, combine, use loop.  Pi returns as a sort of guide and helper, and the PiPhone she inhabits is a very useful tool.  With a to do list, navigation map, a camera option and blueprint reader there’s a decent amount of new pieces that will liven up the journey around the islands.  Arguably, the islands themselves are one of the biggest highlights as the story and puzzles mean trekking around the archipelago solving small puzzles that feed the meta ones.  Progress steadily unlocks as you explore and figure out the breadcrumb clues, whether these are visual or through the abundant conversations.  That’s not to mean there aren’t some points you’ll stop and just scratch your head for an answer on what to do next.  Most of the time the end goal is fairly obvious and it’s a matter of figuring out how to get to it, like with the aforementioned blueprints.  These new additions let Larry build contraptions and will advise on the components needed, so it’s then a case of finding or making something that will do the job.  It works really well and provides not only a point of difference, but a handy guide as well.

It’s not necessary to have played the last game, though with a lot of returning characters it would help so some of the in-jokes don’t go over your head.  The level of dialogue in Wet Dreams Dry Twice is pretty impressive, though don’t expect branching conversations and alternate outcomes, it needs to stick to the point and click rules to make sure no puzzle is unsolvable.  The main characters voice acting is mostly good – Faith’s delivery is a bit flat, and Larry’s suffers from having to be done remotely as it sounds a bit tinny at times; but the majority of the cast throw themselves into their parts.  It’s exaggerated bawdy comedy, and they know what they’re doing.  The writers are also all over the smut with plenty of rude (if mild) suggestions in the script and text.  Nothing beats the artists here though with at least one dick visible in every detailed scene.  That must take a special kind of skill.  With lots of other references on hand from classic and cult sci-fi movies to current news, there’s tonnes to pick up on, and even Covid’s impact on the production gets a shout out.

As far as point and click’s go, there’s very little wrong with Leisure Suit Larry: Wet Dreams Dry Twice.  The logical, if absurd, use of items checks the right boxes; there’s plenty of environment detail in the many locations to investigate (and it’ll highlight all of them if you press both controller sticks in); and between Larry and Pi they say enough to guide you to solutions.  It has got a couple of issues with the translation to console though, mainly in getting the cursor over the right objects.  Some have very specific interaction markers and the fine control needed to reach them first time isn’t there.  Then there’s the labyrinth puzzle near the end of the game… urgh.  It’s one where instruction on the way to navigate a maze are provided and making a wrong door choice sends you back to the beginning.  This is all well and good if you get the instruction wrong, but an absolute pain when the instructions all conflict – which the regularly do on the third trip through the labyrinth.  I’m sure there’s some logic somewhere for figuring it out, though I couldn’t find it and it meant employing a save/reload tactic to get through.

Wet Dreams Dry Twice is More Confessions of a Window Cleaner than Debbie Does Dallas, so anyone only looking at the surface and wondering if this is porn can be assured it isn’t.  Face it, Sony and Nintendo are allowing it on their digital stores, so there’s no graphic sexy time stuff in there.  It doesn’t mean this is for all ages, there’s a lot that you wouldn’t want to have to explain to your kids, but visually you’re not going to be shocked… unless you’ve never seen a dildo, everyone has at least one in Larry’s world.  What it does give you is around 10 hours of taxing puzzles to solve and an entertaining story to follow that’s split across two converging timelines.  Wrapping up the latest incarnation of Larry Laffer (for now anyway), it’s a great example of the genre and the only side effect would be the faces you’ll pulling trying to figure out how you’d use a Screwnicorn.

A PS4 review copy of Leisure Suit Larry: Wet Dreams Dry Twice was provided by Assemble Entertainment’s PR team.  The game is out now on PC, PS4 and Switch for around £35 depending on platform.

The Verdict

8Great

The Good: Lots of multi-layered puzzles | Good dialogue and cast

The Bad: A step back in inclusivity vs. the last game | The labyrinth

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Matt

Co-founder & Editor at Codec Moments

Gamer, F1 fanatic, amateur DJ (out of practice), MGS obsessed, tech geek.

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1 comment

  1. Colm Sheridan June 1, 2021 10:55 am  Reply

    Teenage Colm, would have been all over this game like a rash. Sadly teenage Colm is just a very distant memory. Excellent review as always Matt.

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