Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course

Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course

Worth working up an appetite for?

delicious last course

Cuphead was one of the most anticipated indie games of the year, delivering rock solid gameplay and truly stunning 30s inspired cartoon graphics…  Studio MDHR have crafted a winner.  Though as is the way with modern gaming, players were hungry for more after they had devoured everything the core game had to offer.  After a delay or two, MDHR have finally released Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course.  Right off the bat this may look a little light in terms of content, having only six boss fights… but as is the Cuphead way, it’s not about the quantity it’s about the quality.  It really shows that MDHR have taken the time to craft challenging, as well as highly polished, battles.  Plus they have thrown in a fair few new weapons and charms to spice up the overall gameplay as well.  Not only that, but you also get to play as Ms. Chalice who joins our heroes Cuphead and Mugman, complete with her own moves and skills which help to soften the difficulty a bit too.

The new tale sees Cuphead and Mugman heading to a new island in the hope of turning Ms. Chalice into a real cup person.  Fans will remember her from the core game, as a super move granting spirit.  The boys are in luck as they find a baker who can make a magic tart that will turn Ms. Chalice into a real cup.   Though it’s far from a walk in the park as you’ll have to defeat the powerful foes that are defending each of the tart’s ingredients.  Cue a cartoon fuelled caper that bolts onto the core game perfectly.  The Delicious Last Course is similar to the main game as once again it’s a boss rush affair for the most part, with a few new mini-boss style levels thrown in which replace the run and gun levels of the core game.  You’ll spend most of your time again running round the new hub map, getting power-ups and trying to get the bad guys.  Beware if you’re returning to the game after a bit of time as you’re going to want to get back into the swing of things… the new bosses are not holding back and beyond the first fight it’s a steep learning curve as they throw everything including the kitchen sink at you.

You’ll have to use all the skills you have to dodge their attacks and then time your counter.  To be fair, Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course as brutal as I remember it, though MDHR have taken the edge off things a little, thanks to a number of charms and of course Ms. Chalice…  who you can’t actually use charms with.  She does have a double jump, ground dodge, dash parry and starts with four (yes, four!) HP.  This may hit you as just a new “easy mode”, but all is not as it seems as Ms. Chalice has the worst single jump in the game.  It means you have to double jump every time and the dash parry isn’t as easy to use in certain situations.  Add that to not being able to use any of the charms, especially the new and powerful ones, and it is a real drawback for the character.

Graphically, The Delicious Last Course is stunning, with almost as many animated frames as there was in the core game – the developers have stayed with creating its signature cartoon from the 30s look, and it’s packed with a mind blowing level of detail that will take you more than a few playthroughs to spot everything.  If you’re looking for a new challenge or to return to a modern classic, then you have to test yourself and grab this DLC right now… as it’s the perfect swansong.

An Xbox Series X|S review code for Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course was provided by Studio MDHR’s PR team, and the game is available now on PC, Xbox and PlayStation for around £7 depending on platform.

The Verdict

10Perfect

The Good: Level of detail and polish | New powers and weapons | More Cuphead

The Bad: Little light on content for some maybe

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Stuart Cullen

Scotland’s very own thorn in the side of the London gaming scene bringing all the hottest action straight from The Sun… well… The Scottish Sun at least, every week!

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